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Analysis: Senator Montford Most Likely to Vote Across Party Lines

Posted on August 10, 2017

Analysis: Senator Montford Most Likely to Vote Across Party Lines

A study of votes by the News Service of Florida revealed that Senator Bill Montford was the most likely Democrat to vote across party lines. The study showed that Montford voted with Republicans 27.8% of the time on certain issues.

Montford was the only Northwest Florida legislator on the list developed by the News Service of Florida. The study analyzed legislators from both parties in the Senate and House. The methodology for the analysis is provided at the bottom of the report.

Evan Power, the Chairman of the Leon County Republican Party said, “Sen. Montford is one of the most conservative Democrats in the state legislature.  It does not shock me that he votes many times with the Republican members.  It is probably a good reflection of his district which has democratic strong hold Tallahassee in it, but also includes conservative rural counties.”

Among the lawmakers who cast the most-frequent crossover votes: Rep. Kimberly Daniels, D-Jacksonville; Rep. Rene Plasencia, R-Orlando; Sen. Bill Montford, D-Tallahassee; and Sen. Rene Garcia, R-Hialeah.

The 10 House Democrats most likely to cross party lines, based on an analysis by The News Service of Florida. They are ranked by the percentages of votes they cast with the Democratic caucus on divided issues where the party largely hung together:
Rep. Kimberly Daniels, D-Jacksonville — 64.8 percent
Rep. Katie Edwards, D-Plantation — 71.1 percent
Rep. Roy Hardemon, D-Miami — 74.1 percent
Rep. Nicholas Duran, D-Miami — 78.4 percent
Rep. Matt Willhite, D-Wellington — 79.7 percent
Rep. Jared Moskowitz, D-Coral Springs — 80.0 percent
Rep. David Richardson, D-Miami Beach — 84.0 percent
Rep. Richard Stark, D-Weston — 84.8 percent
Rep. Evan Jenne, D-Dania Beach — 85.5 percent
Rep. Robert Asencio, D-Miami — 86.4

The 10 House Republicans most likely to cross party lines. They are ranked by the percentages of votes they cast with the Republican caucus on divided issues where the party largely hung together:
Rep. Rene Plasencia, R-Orlando — 76.8 percent
Rep. Kathleen Peters, R-Treasure Island — 77.6 percent
Rep. Eric Eisnaugle, R-Orlando* — 77.6 percent
Rep. Bill Hager, R-Delray Beach — 80.8 percent
Rep. Jay Fant, R-Jacksonville — 81.0 percent
Rep. Sam Killebrew, R-Winter Haven — 81.8 percent
Rep. Rick Roth, R-Loxahatchee — 86.6 percent
Rep. Dan Raulerson, R-Plant City — 86.8 percent
Rep. Joe Gruters, R-Sarasota — 87.3 percent
Rep. Don Hahnfeldt, R-The Villages — 88.1 percent
* Eisnaugle has resigned from the House.

The Senate Democrats most likely to cross party lines. They are ranked by the percentages of votes they cast with the Democratic caucus on divided issues where the party largely hung together:
Sen. Bill Montford, D-Tallahassee — 72.2 percent
Sen. Daryl Rouson, D-St. Petersburg — 76.5 percent
Sen. Daphne Campbell, D-Miami — 83.3 percent
Sen. Linda Stewart, D-Orlando — 88.2 percent
Sen. Lauren Book, D-Plantation — 88.9 percent
Sen. Audrey Gibson, D-Jacksonville — 88.9 percent

The Senate Republicans most likely to cross party lines. They are ranked by the percentages of votes they cast with the Republican caucus on divided issues where the party largely hung together:
Sen. Rene Garcia, R-Hialeah — 71.4 percent
Sen. Jack Latvala, R-Clearwater — 75.0 percent
Sen. Anitere Flores, R-Miami — 82.4 percent
Sen. Dana Young, R-Tampa — 88.9 percent
Four senators tied at — 94.4 percent

Methodology

The News Service of Florida analyzed more than 90 votes from the regular legislative session to determine the partisan make-up of votes and the number of times each lawmaker voted against his or her respective party.

Many bills, particularly on non-controversial issues, receive unanimous or near-unanimous support each legislative session.

But the News Service analysis looked at issues where at least 20 percent of the members of the House or Senate voted on each side of the issue. Votes were deemed partisan if less than 10 percent of the membership crossed party lines.

Members’ individual rates of following their parties were calculated separately. A member voted with his or her party if he or she voted the same way as two-thirds of the caucus on one of the divided votes tracked by the analysis. The votes counted were those initially cast, not those recorded or changed by members afterward.

2 Responses to Analysis: Senator Montford Most Likely to Vote Across Party Lines

  1. snydley whiplash Reply

    August 11, 2017 at 10:08 am

    Bill is the last remaining honest democrat on the planet.
    We thought we had located a second one…but we were wrong.

  2. Mr. Curious Reply

    August 11, 2017 at 3:29 pm

    One of the few local politicians that I trust and I’ve showed it with my conservative vote by crossing my party lines and casting my vote for Bill Montford each time. I believes he truly cares for his constituents regardless of party. A true supporter/representative of the people he serves.

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