Leon County Commission Holds Annual Retreat

Leon County Commission Holds Annual Retreat

The Board of Leon County Commissioners held their annual retreat on Monday at the Goodwood Museum and Gardens.

This years retreat was focused on Leon County’s efforts to build social infrastructure, reviewing progress towards the County’s five -year targets, and updating the current strategic plan.

Social infrastructure is comprised of the spaces, places, and other local resources that foster relationships and promote interaction among diverse groups of citizens. County manager Vince Long told the commissioners that local examples of social infrastructure included libraries, community gardens and Cascades Park.

The morning session of the retreat included a presentation and discussion with Dr.Eric Klinenberg, a Professor of Sociology at New York University, Director of the Institute for Public Knowledge.

Dr. Klinenberg discussed how physical spaces and organizations can shape the way people interact, prevent crime, reduce addiction rates, contribute to economic growth, and even ameliorate problems caused by climate change.

The afternoon part of the retreat was largely devoted to the elected officials proposing initiatives or action items for the coming year.

Newly elected Commissioner Rick Minor, based on what he heard during his campaign, encouraged staff to find additional ways for citizens to have meaningful engagement with county government.

Minor also recommended adding information at boat landings about current water quality and fishing advisories and raised the issue of developing an emergency notification system for private pre-schools so that parents had a reliable source for information during a crisis.

Commissioner Kristen Dozier echoed concerns about water quality and discussed ways to expand the use of libraries. She also brought up concerns about the process that awards art and culture grants given the growing impact of tourism on the local economy. Other elected officials were also concerned with the process.

Commissioner Maddox wanted the parameters of social infrastructure to be integrated with the comprehensive land use update. He also requested an evaluation of the effectiveness of the re-entry program for citizens returning to the community after serving their prison sentences and wanted to be supportive of Mark Early, the Supervisor of Elections, in his efforts to implement the recently passed state constitutional amendment to restore felon voting rights.

His final request was to enhance the relationship with Career Source to increase job opportunities for veterans.

Commissioner Mary Ann Lindley discussed her interest in promoting solar by identifying and eliminating barriers to private sector development of solar. She also wanted to pursue a SolSmart designation which recognizes communities that make it easy to use solar.

Lindley also discussed the workforce training of people for jobs using heavy equipment.

Commissioner Bryan Desloge advocated for mapping bike routes and assessing total miles of bike routes as a way to promote the community. Desloge also spoke about an alternate financing instrument for government activities called social impact bonds.

The final speaker, Chairman Jimbo Jackson, wanted staff to pursue an emergency management plan for water release at the hydroelectric generating station on Lake Talquin. Jackson spoke about the flooding issues in the area that become evident after recent weather events.

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5 Responses to "Leon County Commission Holds Annual Retreat"

  1. Parker   December 11, 2018 at 8:11 pm

    Why does West Tallahasee get another 116 homeless, single person bedrooms? That across from Palmetto Apts (Projects). Mad Dog construction just completed 10, 10 bedroom units on this over populated parcel? That is over 200 homeless people packed into this development. Who profits?

    Reply
  2. Grady Underwood   December 11, 2018 at 10:49 pm

    This county is in desperate need of real leadership. It appears that more of the same political b s will be on the way from this group.

    Reply
    • News Maven   December 12, 2018 at 4:53 am

      What else would you expect from county, or city commissars? They are all 50 shades of liberal.
      How much did it cost us taxpayers to fly down the climate change prof to spew his garbage?
      Stop wasting money like that, until all the horrible county dirt roads are paved!

      Reply
  3. Still Disgusted   December 12, 2018 at 10:31 am

    The money being spent for “solar recognition” could pay for a simple paved bike path along Bannerman Rd, that would reduce their fossil fuel “global warming” consumption. I bet if any Commissioner owned the property along Bannerman there would be an unbelievable bike path. Same old BS of what will profit or boost them!

    Reply
  4. Clyde   December 16, 2018 at 3:26 am

    Don’t see any mention of Commissioner Proctor???

    Reply

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