Andrew Gillum Continues “Poll Tax” Narrative Despite Facts

Andrew Gillum Continues “Poll Tax” Narrative Despite Facts

Florida Phoenix, a non-profit statewide media blog, reported on Monday that Florida governor candidate Andrew Gillum called the efforts of the Florida Legislature to implement Amendment 4 a “poll tax.”

Amendment 4 was a ballot initiative which passed with 64% of the vote in 2018 and restored the voting rights of Floridians with felony convictions after they complete all terms of their sentence including parole or probation.

The amendment does not apply to those convicted of murder or sexual offenses.

Florida Phoenix also reported that Gillum said, “It was very, very clear that court fees and fines were not in the constitutional language when voters — again 64 percent of us — went out and approved the constitutional amendment to automatically restore rights to a class of returning citizen.”

However, Florida Phoenix left out important facts about Amendment 4.

First, supporters of Amendment 4 told the Florida Supreme Court under questioning about the initiative, that “complete all terms of their sentence” language included fines, fees and restitution.

Second, Florida Phoenix did not include in their report that the implementation language passed by the Florida Legislature allows for individuals to ask a court to waive fees and allows for community service to be substituted for payment in certain instances.

Rather, Florida Phoenix adopted language of those supporting no payment any fees and reported that voters “automatically” restored voting rights for some 1.4 million people who had felony records (except those convicted of murder or sex crimes.)

During another line of questioning, Rep. Barry Loudermilk of Georgia asked Gillum about the state’s efforts to remove voters from the polls who are not eligible to vote.

“Mr. Gillum, you are not opposed to legal purging of the voter database to remove those who are not eligible to vote,” Loudermilk asked.

“I would say I don’t trust the purging process in this state,” Gillum replied, arguing the process is targeted at hampering the minority vote.

Late last year TR reported that Gillum’s brother, Marcus, voted in Leon County, Florida while he was a resident Chicago, Illinois. Months after the report, Marcus Gillum was purged from Leon County’s voter rolls.


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7 Responses to "Andrew Gillum Continues “Poll Tax” Narrative Despite Facts"

  1. News Maven   May 6, 2019 at 5:41 pm

    The Phoenix is an ultra left progressive startup.
    Right up AOC and Colonel Sanders’ alley.
    Pay no attention to them.
    They are even more irrelevant that the local rag.

    Reply
  2. Hope   May 6, 2019 at 6:37 pm

    Poor Andrew just blowing smoke in a vain attempt to become relevant… Pay no attention.

    I believe even Andrew’s supporters. – if he still has any – won’t even jump on this bandwagon.

    Reply
    • Pretty Petty   May 10, 2019 at 11:29 am

      First, he has supporters all over the country. I am not opposed to having fines paid before restoration of voting rights if, and only if, all those owing monies to the government are also required to pay all their fines and taxes before voting. The legislature is proposing that owing money makes one unqualified to vote. If that’s true, let it be true across the board for all voters.

      Reply
  3. Bus Driver   May 6, 2019 at 10:24 pm

    Just stop Andy!

    Reply
  4. TONY   May 7, 2019 at 7:12 am

    BUT, isn’t any Fee’s and or Fines usually part of the Probation Condition just like if you are made to take classes like Anger Management or made to go to AA Meetings or Rehab?

    Reply
  5. Rosemary N. Palmer   May 7, 2019 at 1:10 pm

    The Voters didn’t know what supporters told a court. They knew the language and without a comma between the parole and probation that can and was reasonably read as having finished parole and probation (which presumably already included any financial obligations, and if it didn’t then legislators never thought it was important).

    I’d have a lot less cynicism about the legislator’s intent if the partisanship wasn’t so blatant. When felons were excluded from voting, it was because the prison votes had the power to control who was responsible for the incarceration. There isn’t any civic reason to prevent ex-felons from voting. I am not sure why Republicans seem to think that ex-felons equal Democratic voting — many I know value freedom and good government having seen how bad corruption and abuse of power can be. But certainly it will mean more black voters, which is a good thing because it means all those who are citizens can be part of decisions. Having ownership in society improves conditions in society, generally speaking.

    I’m ashamed of our legislators and to the extent this was partisan, we should not reelect any one who opposes full restoration of voting rights upon completion of sentence including probation and parole.

    Reply
  6. Mike   May 9, 2019 at 9:03 am

    Anyone “opposed to LEGAL purging of the voter rolls of all those ineligible to vote” is simply trying to get cover for election cheating. Simple as that.

    Just the same as anyone being “opposed to a photo ID to prove identity when voting” is to provide cover for cheating. That’s the reason Dem-Socialists fight like hell to stop the photo ID requirement. Simple as that.

    Reply

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